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Global Hunger Index 2016 - Africa Edition

Global Hunger Index 2016 - Africa Edition

„Zero Hunger“ by 2030 - Political will must be there to transform this goal into reality

The New Global Hunger Index Africa Editon reveals that despite progress, levels of hunger in many African countries are still unacceptably high

Progress has been made but it has been too slow: the levels of hunger in many countries remain unacceptably high. Of the 42 countries in Africa for which GHI scores could be calculated in this report, only three countries have scores that fall into the “low” hunger category, another six are categorized as moderate; 28 countries fall into the “serious” category and another five have 2016 GHI scores in the “alarming” category.

The report shows that the rate of hunger reduction must accelerate in Africa south of the Sahara in order for countries to achieve their commitments under the Malabo Declaration and reach the second Sustainable Development Goal (SDG2) of Zero Hunger by 2030. If this region were to reduce its hunger levels between 2016 and 2030 at the same pace of reduction it experienced since 2000, it would still have GHI scores between the moderate and serious categories—falling far short of the goal to reach Zero Hunger by 2030. The rate of improvement must accelerate and sufficient resources must be directed towards the solutions in order to effect lasting change.

A farmer clears a paddy field of weeds and algae, Mwogo Valley cooperative, Rwanda. © Daniel Pilar
A farmer clears a paddy field of weeds and algae, Mwogo Valley cooperative, Rwanda. © Daniel Pilar

The world, including Africa, can achieve the goal of reaching Zero Hunger by 2030, but the political will must be there to transform this goal into reality.

It is clear that governments must now follow through on their promises with political will and commitment to action that is both strong and sustained. The root causes of hunger are complex and require multi-sectoral and multilevel collaboration. The role of national governments in achieving these goals by significantly enhancing the quality of implementation is also clear. Yet Zero Hunger can only be achieved when governments measure progress and are accountable to citizens, which requires capacities to collect and analyze data, combined with open and comprehensive review and dialogue processes. The biennial review process established under Malabo and the support to inclusive Joint Sector Review (JSR) processes under CAADP are critical building blocks in this regard. Read more in the Global Hunger Index Africa Edition.

The 2016 Global Hunger Index Africa Edition is a report, focused on Africa and produced for the first time this year by the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI), Concern Worldwide, and Welthungerhilfe in conjunction with NEPAD.

Read the report:

Global Hunger Index Africa Edition - PDF Download

Indice de la Faim dans le Monde Édition Afrique (French) - PDF-Download

Further reading on the GHI 2016

Global Hunger Index 2016

Is Zero Hunger achievable?

Global Hunger Index 2016: The level of hunger in the developing world has declined by 29 percent since 2000. But that is by no means a reason to sit back. 

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Fraser Patterson

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What the GHI measures
  1. Proportion of undernourished people in the population.
  2. Proportion of children under the age of five who suffer from wasting.
  3. Proportion of children under the age of five who suffer from stunting.
  4. Proportion of children who die before their fifth birthday.

The GHI is based on a 100-point scale whose extremes are never reached.

  • Scoring up to 10 points = 'low' hunger
  • Scoring more than 50 points = 'extremely alarming' hunger
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